Resources

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    4th Annual Lung Health Barometer

    Survey reveals need to educate high-risk Americans about lung cancer screening.

    Read More

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    Doctor discussion guide

    If you are at high risk for lung cancer, download this conversation guide and share it with your doctor to talk about next steps.

    Download Guide

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    Screening criteria

    Is lung cancer screening right for you or a loved one?

    Download Fact Sheet

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    Lung cancer screening insurance chart

    Everything you need to know about lung cancer screening insurance coverage.

    Download Chart

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    Healthcare professional conversation tips

    If you are diagnosed with lung cancer, see our top ten tips for communicating with your healthcare professionals.

    Download Tips

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    Lung Cancer Screening Facility Information

    If you and your doctor determine you should be screened, review this guide to help ensure you are receiving the best care possible at a screening facility.

    Download Guide

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    Lung Cancer Screening Insurance Worksheet

    Use this worksheet to help guide a conversation with your insurance company about what your insurance will cover.

    Download Worksheet

 For friends and family

How do I talk to a friend or loved one about getting screened for lung cancer?

Lung cancer screening can help save lives, but it can be difficult to start the conversation about screening with someone you care about. Below are some tips for talking to someone you know about lung cancer screening:

  • 1. Be encouraging, non-judgmental and empathetic

    It can be scary for someone with a smoking history to think about being screened for lung cancer. Often, people who smoke or have smoked feel guilty for smoking, and wish they never started. Smoking is a powerful addiction and most smokers started when they were young, before they knew about the health risks. Remind your loved one that you will support them no matter what, and that you are not judging them for their smoking history.

  • 2. Focus on the potential benefits

    The prospect of finding lung cancer is frightening. Some people may shy away from screening because they think lung cancer is a death sentence. Educate your loved one about how screening helps find lung cancer early, when it is much easier to treat. Also, there are more lung cancer treatment options available today than ever before. You might want to share some stories of people who were saved by the scan.

  • 3. Break down barriers

    Your loved one might be concerned about the cost of the screening test. You can remind them that screening is available without a cost-sharing for patients who meet the high-risk criteria. Also, some people haven’t been to a doctor in years, or shy away from making medical appointments. Offer to help your loved one set up the appointment, so it is one less roadblock.

  • 4. Remind them you care

    Let your loved one know that you are having this conversation because you care. You want them to be around for a long time. Offer to go through the quiz and the resources on this site with them.

  • 5. Let the information sink in

    Sometimes, people need time to mull over information and think about it before they come to a decision. Share this website and its resources with your loved one. Let them know the American Lung Association’s Lung HelpLine is available to answer any questions they may have. Encourage them to talk to their doctor. If your loved one still doesn’t want to get screened, you may want to try to have the conversation again in a few months. Maybe their perspective has changed after they’ve had time to sit with the information. Let them know you will support them during the whole process.

Have Some Tips You’d Like to Share?

If you’ve already had a similar conversation with a loved one, and you have additional tips you’d like to share, please feel free to email us at info@Lung.org.

Help Your Loved One Get Screened

For healthcare professionals

  • Patient support and education

    Lung cancer can be a challenging subject for your patients. We’ve put together a guide, so you can provide the best support and education on whether the low-dose CT scan is right for them.

    Download Guide

  • Patient conversation guide

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force published this fact sheet to help you speak with your patients about screening for lung cancer.

    Download Directly