Wildfire Smoke Continues to Blanket California, Pacific Northwest | American Lung Association

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Wildfire Smoke Continues to Blanket California, Pacific Northwest

Unhealthy air quality levels are expected; American Lung Association warns of health harms from breathing smoky air, exposure to ash

(October 20, 2017) - CHICAGO

For more information please contact:

Allison MacMunn
Media@Lung.org
312-801-7628

Wildfires continue to burn throughout California and have burned in the Pacific Northwest since July and August. The smoke from these fires along with stagnant weather conditions and near-record high temperatures have created widespread unhealthy air quality. The American Lung Association warns that dangerous smoke from these wildfires poses lethal health hazards to people living and working in surrounding areas.

Residents with respiratory problems such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and those with chronic heart disease should take extra precautions during this time and call their physician immediately if problems develop. In addition, for those returning to their homes to clean up and salvage belongings, the Lung Association points out that the risk is not over: exposure to ash from building fires during cleanup can be dangerous.

Exposure to wildfire smoke can cause serious health problems ranging from pneumonia and asthma attacks to cardiovascular harm. Most vulnerable to smoke exposure are children and teens, pregnant women, the elderly and anyone with existing respiratory problems or heart disease.

"Even those without lung disease are at risk during this time," said American Lung Association Volunteer Spokesperson Brian Christman, M.D. "With high smoke levels, people face an increased risk of dangerous health effects ranging from coughing and wheezing to more serious illness, including reduced lung function, bronchitis, worsening of asthma, and premature death. This is especially concerning for older adults and outdoor workers. Parents should give particular care to children as they are most susceptible to smoke because their lungs are still developing."

Even after the fire is out and families return home, risks from the ash remain. Cleaning up the soot can spread ash from the fires into the air, making it easy to inhale. Ash from burned buildings can contain even more harmful particles than wildfire smoke, including asbestos, arsenic, nickel, lead and other hazardous materials from the structure.  

The American Lung Association offers the following tips:

  • Stay inside as much as possible, with doors, windows and fireplace dampers shut – with clean air circulating through air conditioners and/or air cleaners. Residents should use the recirculation setting on their home air conditioners to avoid outdoor air contamination. Using whole house fans is not recommended because they can allow unfiltered outside air into the home.
  • When driving through smoky areas, car windows and vents should be closed. Air conditioning should be set to recirculate to avoid exposure to outside air.
  • Avoid exercising outdoors, particularly if you smell smoke or experience eye or throat irritation.
  • If you have lung disease, check in with your physician regarding any changes in medication that may be needed to cope with the smoky conditions. If you experience any symptoms, contact your physician immediately.
  • If you’re returning to a fire-damaged home, keep children away from the ash and limit your contact with it as well. Wear an N-95 mask, protective clothing, gloves and goggles to reduce your exposure.

More information on how to protect yourself from wildfire smoke is available on Lung.org. You can also call the American Lung Association Lung HelpLine at 1-800-LUNG-USA to speak with respiratory therapists and registered nurses regarding questions about lung health.

For media interested in speaking with an expert about lung health and wildfires, contact the American Lung Association at Media@Lung.org or 312-801-7628.

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About the American Lung Association

The American Lung Association is the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease, through research, education and advocacy. The work of the American Lung Association is focused on four strategic imperatives: to defeat lung cancer; to improve the air we breathe; to reduce the burden of lung disease on individuals and their families; and to eliminate tobacco use and tobacco-related diseases. For more information about the American Lung Association, a holder of the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Guide Seal, or to support the work it does, call 1-800-LUNGUSA (1-800-586-4872) or visit: Lung.org.

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