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Latest Lung Cancer News

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  • Antioxidants: Lung Cancer’s Friend or Foe?
    July 24, 2019  |  Editorial Staff
    Dietary supplements have long been believed by some to provide your body needed vitamins and guard against disease. There was a time when it was thought that antioxidant supplementation could be a major breakthrough for disease treatment and prevention. But recently, two studies have found evidence that antioxidants may cause lung cancer cells to spread.
    Related Topic:  Health & Wellness
  • Can Dogs Sniff Out Lung Cancer?
    July 2, 2019  |  Editorial Staff
    Researchers from the Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine may have taken an important step in improving the ability to detect lung cancer. Their study, recently released in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, successfully trained three dogs to use their superior smelling skills to identify cancerous blood samples. Though similar studies have been performed in the past, researchers are hopeful that these new findings will lead to a simpler lung cancer test for patients.
    Related Topic:  Health & Wellness
  • To the Dads
    June 13, 2019  |  Editorial Staff
    Every day, there are brave dads struggling with lung disease. These stories serve as a reminder that we must do whatever it takes to end lung disease, for the dads, and for everyone.
    Related Topics:  Health & Wellness, LUNG FORCE,
  • What You Need to Know about Precision Medicine: A Guide
    February 4, 2019  |  Carly Ornstein
    Follow this flow chart to be guided through the highlights of our expert panel on the growing field of lung cancer precision medicine and subsequent drug approvals.
    Related Topics:  Health & Wellness, LUNG FORCE,
  • When an Injury Turns into a Lung Cancer Scare
    January 29, 2019  |  Carly Ornstein
    At the end of 2018, according to press reports, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had early stage lung cancer surgically removed. Justice Ginsburg had what physicians call an "incidental finding." It was widely reported that Ginsburg's cancer was found during tests she received while being treated for a rib fracture. In other words, while physicians were treating her for something else, they stumbled upon early stage lung cancer. This is not entirely uncommon. Pulmonary nodules (small growths in the lung) are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Most of these nodules are not cancerous, or benign. They can be caused by previous infections or illnesses and sometimes there is no known cause. Some small lung nodules will turn out to be lung cancer.
    Related Topic:  LUNG FORCE
  • Are There Environmental or Health Factors that Can Cause Lung Cancer?
    January 24, 2019  |  Editorial Staff
    Lung cancer is caused when cells in the lung mutate or change. Researchers have spent decades trying to understand what causes these cells to mutate. Most lung cancers are caused when someone repeatedly breathes in toxic substances. However, for some people, the cause of their lung cancer is never known.
  • The Fighters
    December 18, 2018  |  Editorial Staff
    Behind every fight for breath, there’s a story: a husband who battles through long and difficult treatment. A mom who keeps going for her son. A dad who inspires his kids to ensure no one has to suffer like him.Every story is a reminder that this community will do whatever it takes to stop lung disease, for ourselves and for others. We wanted to share a snapshot of these people, their lives and those who love them.
    Related Topics:  Health & Wellness, LUNG FORCE,
  • Watchful Waiting and Lung Cancer Treatment: When is it the right choice?
    December 14, 2018  |  Editorial Staff
    You watch sunsets or movies or birds. You wait for buses or amusement park rides or your turn in line. But what do watching and waiting have to do with lung cancer? It can seem counterintuitive to a lung cancer patient for their doctor to recommend "watchful waiting" or “active surveillance” as the right course of action for treating their lung cancer tumor.
    Related Topics:  Health & Wellness, LUNG FORCE,
  • Do No Harm: Why You Shouldn’t Smoke Around Lung Cancer Patients
    December 6, 2018  |  Editorial Staff
    Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure is unsafe for everyone, but did you know that it can be especially dangerous for people with lung cancer ? We sat down with Oladimeji Akinboro, M.D., M.P.H., Fellow, Hematology/Oncology at Boston University Medical Center to discuss what is known about the impacts of secondhand smoke exposures on lung cancer patients and what still needs to be discovered.
  • Tumor Testing Can Open the Door for New Lung Cancer Treatments
    November 13, 2018  |  Editorial Staff
    Fast and furious. That is an accurate way to categorize the progress that has been made in personalized (or precision) medicine in lung cancer over the past several years. For decades, lung cancer was treated with a one-size-fits-all approach. But now, scientists are learning more about what makes up cancer tumors and causes them to grow, opening the door for treatment tailored to patients’ unique needs.
    Related Topics:  LUNG FORCE, Science,
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    Page Last Updated: March 13, 2018

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