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January 2019 Articles

  • woman looking at x-ray results on a wall When an Injury Turns into a Lung Cancer Scare
    January 29, 2019  |  Carly Ornstein
    At the end of 2018, according to press reports, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had early stage lung cancer surgically removed. Justice Ginsburg had what physicians call an "incidental finding." It was widely reported that Ginsburg's cancer was found during tests she received while being treated for a rib fracture. In other words, while physicians were treating her for something else, they stumbled upon early stage lung cancer. This is not entirely uncommon. Pulmonary nodules (small growths in the lung) are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Most of these nodules are not cancerous, or benign. They can be caused by previous infections or illnesses and sometimes there is no known cause. Some small lung nodules will turn out to be lung cancer.
    Related Topic:  LUNG FORCE
  • Doctor and patient looking at x-ray Are There Environmental or Health Factors that Can Cause Lung Cancer?
    January 24, 2019  |  Editorial Staff
    Lung cancer is caused when cells in the lung mutate or change. Researchers have spent decades trying to understand what causes these cells to mutate. Most lung cancers are caused when someone repeatedly breathes in toxic substances. However, for some people, the cause of their lung cancer is never known.
  • man and woman standing in front of a house So Your Home Has High Radon Levels. Now What?
    January 14, 2019  |  Editorial Staff
    You’ve tested your home for radon as we keep urging you to, and, surprise! You discover your levels are dangerously high. Now what? First, relax: you’re not alone. One in 15 homes across the country tests positive for dangerous levels of radon, an invisible, odorless gas that causes lung cancer.
    Related Topic:  Healthy Air
  • The word Five Things to Know about Whooping Cough
    January 10, 2019  |  Editorial Staff
    Before a vaccine was introduced in the late 1940s, pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough, was a leading cause of childhood illness and death in the United States. The vaccine was so effective that the number of cases in the U.S. went from more than a million diagnosed between 1940-1945, to less than 3,000 a year by the mid-1980s.
    Related Topic:  Health & Wellness
  • Najee Richardson Q&A with Najee Richardson
    January 7, 2019  |  Editorial Staff
    Najee Richardson, a former gymnast, is well-known as one of three 2018 finalists in NBC’s American Ninja Warrior championship. The action-packed series follows competitors as they tackle challenging obstacle courses in both city qualifying and city final rounds across the country. Those who successfully complete the finals course in their designated region move on to the national finals round in Las Vegas, where they face a four-stage obstacle course, competing for a cash prize.

    Page Last Updated: February 4, 2019

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