DON'T QUIT ON YOUR RESOLUTION TO QUIT SMOKING!

American Lung Association Resources Offer Support to Help Americans Quit Smoking in 2010

(February 25, 2010)

Every year, millions of Americans faithfully make New Year's resolutions including quitting smoking. However, a recent survey with more than 1,000 former smokers conducted on behalf of the American Lung Association showed that 60 percent of people were not able to quit smoking on their first try and required multiple attempts to quit smoking. 

Helping more Americans quit smoking remains a top public health priority for the American Lung Association. A new smoking cessation campaign from the Association is available to the many smokers who may have given up on their resolution and provides resources and support for the "Quitter in You."

The survey also showed that the main reasons a smoker decides to quit are because of the costs of smoking (35 percent), and to improve their health (33 percent).

"Quitting smoking is the single most important step a smoker can take to improve the length and quality of his or her life.  You can also save a considerable amount of money," said Charles D. Connor, American Lung Association President and CEO. "These results coincide with what we already know about the benefits of quitting smoking, to your health as well as financially.  I encourage all smokers to make a plan to quit this year, talk to your doctor about how to quit smoking and utilize the support and resources available from the American Lung Association."

Support for the Quitter in You

The Quitter in You campaign is designed to change the way Americans look at quitting smoking by acknowledging that past attempts to quit smoking aren't failures or wasted efforts, but are normal and sometimes necessary steps along the way to quitting for good.

Anyone who has tried to quit smoking knows it does not always happen on the first try. But what many smokers don't realize is that they are not alone in their past quit attempts.  The campaign features a new Web site called QuitterInYou.org.  At the site, you can view stories and videos of successful quitters, share advice and other forms of support, as well as tap into national and local American Lung Association cessation resources.

The Association encourages all smokers to try to quit smoking in 2010, even if they have tried many times in the past, and has many supportive and motivational programs to help them on the journey to becoming smoke-free. 

Along with the Quitter in You campaign, the American Lung Association provides a number of proven resources that have helped over a million Americans quit smoking for good.

  • Freedom From Smoking® Group Clinic – This program is offered as a group clinic to help adult smokers work through the problems and process of quitting.  Participants in Freedom From Smoking® develop a personalized step-by-step plan to quit smoking. Contact 1-800-LUNG-USA to speak with your local Lung Association about participating.  
  • Freedom From Smoking® Online  – Check out this online smoking cessation program (www.ffsonline.org) which takes smokers through the same recommendations online and provides interaction with other smokers from across the country.
  • Lung HelpLine – Call the American Lung Association Lung HelpLine at 1-800-LUNG-USA to receive smoking cessation counseling and one-on-one support from registered nurses and respiratory therapists.

 Below are 10 tips from the American Lung Association to help smokers quit smoking for good in 2010.

  1. It takes most smokers several tries before they can quit for good. So, if you've tried a few times, keep on trying to quit.
  2. Exercise to improve your fitness as you quit smoking.
  3. Talk to your doctor about the various quit smoking medications available to help you quit.
  4. Get rid of all the cigarettes in your home, car, desk or office.
  5. Reduce exposure to smoking triggers like: drinks after work or weekend card games.
  6. Spend time in nonsmoking places: homes of nonsmoking friends, libraries, theaters, and health clubs.
  7. Focus on today. Just get through today without smoking. .
  8. Inhale and exhale as if you are really smoking. You will find that you are actually sighing!
  9. To reduce stress, get up 15 minutes earlier in the morning.
  10. Watch TV in a room where you rarely smoke rather than in your usual spot.

Quitter in You is made possible though funding from Pfizer Inc.

About the American Lung Association

Now in its second century, the American Lung Association is the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease. With your generous support, the American Lung Association is "Fighting for Air" through research, education and advocacy. For more information about the American Lung Association or to support the work it does, call 1-800-LUNG-USA (1-800-586-4872) or visit www.lung.org