Diagnosing and Treating Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia (COP) | American Lung Association

Diagnosing and Treating Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia (COP)

COP (formerly called BOOP) is a rare disease of unknown cause. It is usually diagnosed by ruling out other diseases. Sometimes the signs, symptoms, X-ray and biopsy findings of COP may occur as side effects of medications.  It is essential to determine whether the condition is caused by a medication because stopping that treatment will help to treat the disease. 

What to Expect

Your doctor will ask you many questions about your health to get a detailed patient history. He or she will also most likely have you undergo several tests before a diagnosis is given.

How COP Is Diagnosed

A diagnosis of COP will usually include a clinical evaluation, a detailed patient history and identification of characteristic findings. Your health provider may also order specialized tests such as chest X-rays, laboratory tests, pulmonary function tests, and possibly a lung biopsy.

How COP Is Treated

Sometimes COP will go away on its own; however, in most cases some form of treatment is necessary. The treatment of choice is corticosteroids, such as prednisone. Cytotoxic drugs such as cyclophosphamide may be used to treat COP if there is no improvement with corticosteroid treatment.

It is important to note that COP is not responsive to antibiotic treatment.


    This content was developed in partnership with the CHEST Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the American College of Chest Physicians.


    Ask An Expert

    Questions about your lung health? Need help finding healthcare? Call 1-800-LUNGUSA.

    Get help
    We need your generous support

    Make a difference by delivering research, education and advocacy to those impacted by lung disease.

    What is LUNG FORCE?

    LUNG FORCE unites women and their loved ones across the country to stand together in the fight against lung cancer.

    Get involved
    Join the fight for healthy lungs and healthy air.
    Donate Now.