Helping with Treatment

As a caregiver, you are instrumental in offering support during your loved one’s treatment phase. During appointments it is okay to ask questions, but let the patient speak first. If you have more questions you may want to schedule an appointment to speak with the doctor alone. Most importantly, make sure you have permission from the patient to speak with the doctor about the patient’s medical records. You can encourage your loved one to take the lead in his or her care and offer support in a variety ways.

  • Make sure all appointments are kept and treatment instructions are followed. You can help your loved one stay organized and get to and from treatments.
  • Get to know the care team. That way, you will be more comfortable asking questions.
  • Come to doctor’s appointment prepared with the followings items:
    • List of your loved one’s medications, allergies and medical history
    • Any changes in symptoms, diet and activity you notice
    • A list of questions and concerns
    • A notepad
  • Know when to call the doctor! Call immediately if your loved one experiences any of the following:
    • Black or bloody bowel movements
    • Bleeding from your nose or gums
    • Blurred vision
    • Bruising without injury
    • Chest pain or tightness
    • Chills
    • Confusion
    • Constipation that lasts more than three days
    • Diarrhea that lasts more than one day
    • Dizziness
    • Fainting
    • Fever
    • Headaches
    • Intense fatigue
    • Numbness
    • Pain while urinating
    • Pain, redness, swelling or pus at the surgical site
    • Pink or red urine
    • Pounding or rapidly beating heart
    • Progressive weakness
    • Rash
    • Shortness of breath
    • Tingling
    • Worsened skin reaction

Early detection of lung cancer can increase survival rates. Call the Lung Helpline at 1-800-LUNGUSA or talk to your doctor about lung cancer screening.