Wildfire Smoke Continues to Blanket the Pacific Northwest | American Lung Association

Wildfire Smoke Continues to Blanket the Pacific Northwest

(September 5, 2017)

For more information please contact:

Allison Hickey
Allison.Hickey@lung.org
206-512-3287

Unhealthy air quality levels are expected; American Lung Association Warns of Health Harms from Breathing Smoky Air

MONTANA – Over 25 wildfires continue to burn throughout the Pacific Northwest. The smoke from these fires along with stagnant weather conditions and near-record high temperatures are creating air quality in the unhealthy levels. Dangerous smoke from these wildfires poses lethal health hazards to people living and working in surrounding areas. Residents with respiratory problems such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and those with chronic heart disease should take extra precautions during this time and call their physician immediately if problems develop.

The smoke from wildfires is a mixture of carbon dioxide, water vapor, carbon monoxide, particulate matter (known as PM), hydrocarbons, other organic chemicals, nitrogen oxides and trace minerals. Exposure to this smoke can cause serious health problems ranging from pneumonia and asthma attacks to cardiovascular episodes. Most vulnerable to smoke exposure are babies, small children, pregnant women, the elderly and anyone with existing respiratory problems or heart disease.

“Even those without lung disease are at risk during this time,” said Carrie Nyssen, Vice President of Advocacy and Air Quality for the American Lung Association in Montana. “With the rising smoke levels, there is an increased risk of dangerous health effects ranging from respiratory tract irritation to more serious illness, including reduced lung function, bronchitis, worsening of asthma, and premature death. This is especially concerning for older adults and outdoor workers. Special care should be given to children as they are most susceptible to smoke because their lungs are still developing.”

“We know that about 95 percent of smokers try their first cigarette before age 21, and many tobacco users transition from experimenting to regular tobacco use between the ages of 18 and 21,” said Carrie Nyssen.“ This is a critical time to protect our youth and young adults from the dangers of tobacco use and nicotine addiction. The urge to experiment is natural, but that doesn’t mean youth and young adults are seeking to get hooked on tobacco their entire lives.”

The American Lung Association offers the following tips:

  • Stay inside as much as possible, with doors, windows and fireplace dampers shut – with clean air circulating through air conditions and/or air cleaners. Residents should use the recirculation setting on their home air conditions to avoid outdoor air contamination. Using whole house fans is not recommended because they can allow unfiltered outside air into the home.
  • When driving through smoky areas, car windows and vents should be closed. Air conditioning should be set to recirculate to avoid exposure to outside air.
  • Avoid exercising outdoors, particularly if you smell smoke of experience eye of throat irritation.
  • If you have lung disease, check in with your physician regarding any changes in medication that may be needed to cope with the smoky conditions. If you experience any symptoms, contact your physician immediately.
  • Check the quality of your air. Visit www.airnow.gov or download the AirNow

More information on how to protect yourself from wildfire smoke can be found here. You can also call the American Lung Association Lung HelpLine at 1-800-LUNG-USA to speak with respiratory therapists and registered nurses regarding questions about lung health.

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About the American Lung Association

The American Lung Association is the leading organization working to save lives by improving lung health and preventing lung disease, through research, education and advocacy. The work of the American Lung Association is focused on four strategic imperatives: to defeat lung cancer; to improve the air we breathe; to reduce the burden of lung disease on individuals and their families; and to eliminate tobacco use and tobacco-related diseases. For more information about the American Lung Association, a holder of the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Guide Seal, or to support the work it does, call 1-800-LUNGUSA (1-800-586-4872) or visit: Lung.org.

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