LUNG FORCE Lung Cancer Call-In Day – 9/4/14

(September 2, 2014)

Lung cancer, the #1 cancer killer of both women and men in the United States, must be a national priority. With one of the highest incidence rates and one of the lowest survival rates, lung cancer desperately needs more research for early detection, treatment and cures. On September 4, we are taking action to reverse this trend, and increase funding for lung cancer research.

You are invited to join a chorus of voices taking a stand in the fight against lung cancer. Join the American Lung Association's LUNG FORCE Lung Cancer Call-In Day on September 4.

Let's all harness the power of our collective voice by calling our elected officials in Washington, D.C. on one day: September 4. Speaking with a unified voice on the same day will have a greater impact about the need for lung cancer research funding.

Who to call:
Call your two senators and one representative in Congress. You can find their names and phone numbers here.

When to call:
Thursday, September 4, 2014, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST. The more calls we make on that one day, the more our message to Congress will resonate loud and clear.

What to say:
We've prepared an easy-to-follow set of talking points you can use when you place your calls. Just sign up here and we'll send you the talking points on September 4. Or, visit www.LUNGFORCE.org/Call on September 4 for the talking points.

Where to learn more:
Go to LUNGFORCE.org/Call for all you need to make your voice heard!

About lung cancer:

  • Lung cancer is the #1 cancer killer of both women and men in the United States.
  • In 1987, lung cancer surpassed breast cancer as the leading cancer killer among American women:
    • Every five minutes, a woman in the U.S. is told she has lung cancer.
    • The lung cancer death rate in women has more than doubled over the past 35 years.
  • Lung cancer survival rates are low, especially compared to those of other leading cancers with screening modalities.
  • One of the reasons lung cancer survival rates are so poor is few cases are diagnosed in early stages when survival is better; screening for lung cancer offers the hope of increased detection at earlier stages and subsequent better survival.
  • Anyone can get lung cancer.